November 27, 2020

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WILLAMETTE HERITAGE CENTER

1313 Mill Street SE, Suite 200, Salem, OR 97301-6591 • 503.585.7012• willametteheritage.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE — 26 Aug. 2020

Information Contact: Michelle Cordova, Executive Director | 503.585.7012 michellec@willametteheritage.org

 Willamette Heritage Center Announces New Hours of Operations and Services

SALEM, OR – The Willamette Heritage Center (WHC) continues to modify services to meet the community’s needs and fulfill our mission while following the COVID-19 health and safety guidelines set by the state and dealing with economic realities for business like ours that rely on people coming through the doors. The museum will be closed to the public August 31 – September 7, 2020. On Tuesday, September 8th, the Center will reopen with our new hours of operation and services. Beginning that date, the site and our retail partners will be open to the public Tuesdays – Saturdays, 10 am to 4 pm.

Our new services plan for each department is as follows:

Visiting the Museum:

Starting in September, the WHC will be requiring advance booking for access to the museum. While you’ll still have the opportunity to view the grounds, feed the ducks and check out our introductory overview to Mid-Valley history in our orientation center during the opening hours listed above, access to the exhibits in the historic houses and Thomas Kay Woolen Mill will require a timed admission ticket. Entrance tickets are for self-guided tours and are limited to Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays between 10 am and 4 pm. Tickets must be purchased one week in advance and are available on the Center’s website at: www.willametteheritage.org/hours-and-prices.

 

 

Research:

Due to social distancing guidelines and reduced staff, the WHC Research Library is closed to drop-in visitors until further notice. However, the public can still access collections through appointments, email, and some new fee-for-service options. The WHC is currently putting a hold on accepting collections at this time. Learn more here: www.willametteheritage.org/research.

 

 

Event Rentals:

Following the CDC and state guidelines for COVID-19, the event rental spaces continue to be utilized by community members at the WHC as well. Several events are already planned this summer and new reservations are being made. Be sure to take advantage of the outside space or large event rooms, like the Spinning Room, for an intimate gathering this fall, while still maintaining social distancing. Found out more at: www.willametteheritage.org/event-reservations/

The Willamette Heritage Center, unification between Mission Mill Museum (1964) and Marion County Historical Society (1950), is a stroll through the history of the Willamette Valley. Its 5-acre campus is home to the 1841 Jason Lee house (arguably the oldest wooden framed house in Oregon), 1841 Willamette Mission Parsonage, 1847 John Boon home, 1858 Pleasant Grove Church and the 1896 Thomas Kay Woolen Mill, named an American Treasure by the National Park Service. As a private non-profit association, for more than sixty years WHC has established a reputation as a leader in the preservation and interpretation of Oregon’s history. The museum’s histories are shared with visitors through daily group tours, speakers, living history, children’s programs, hands-on activities, special events, publications, the museum store and rental facilities. For more information call 503-585-7012 or visit www.willametteheritage.org.
The Willamette Heritage Center is a private not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization. It is not managed by city, county, state or federal agencies.

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Kickin’ Cancer (in the Donkey) Challenge

In May 2018 Baron Robison, in an effort to support his sister, Brenda Farris, along with 42 other runners, wearing HOT pink t-shirts were covered in mud doing the Warrior Dash.  Then in Aug. 2018 Brenda returned to Oregon for a Spartan race and held a joint fundraiser for a coworker of Baron’s who was also dealing with breast cancer.  In October 2018 they assisted a family who had lost their father to brain cancer. Finally in Dec.2018 HelpTeamBrenda partnered with MOD Pizza locations in Salem, Sherwood, Lake Oswego, and Milwaukie to fundraise for Marissa Leigh in her struggle with breast cancer.  With the success of these fundraisers Baron realized he should create KickinCancer aka “WeAreTheSolution – United to Prevent”, which is a Domestic Non-Profit Corporation in Oregon.  KickinCancer’s purpose is to: EMPOWER individuals, through education, to take control of their own bodies, so that cancer cases are significantly reduced, while emotionally and financially supporting families IN the fight.

The KickinCancer movement is gaining speed and going global. It has become a movement to truly kick cancer. We, collectively and globally, as people of all nations have the power to unite, come together and begin preventing cancer. The annual fundraiser for KickinCancer is a golfathon where fundraising participants will smash 100 golf balls on Nov. 1. We ask you, no we implore you, to aid this growing movement financially. If you would like to join us by being a participant in the fundraising efforts or help us by pledging toward this event we say “Thank you” now.  All great movement have occurred because of the number of people shared a belief in the end result, but they all need to be funded. “United, as people, WE ARE THE SOLUTION, so save yourself, then each one teach one”  has become our motto.

For more information on the golfathon go to Kicking-Cancer.org/golfathon/ If you would like to participate or pledge Baron Robison can be reached at ExecDir@Kicking-Cancer.org.  So, if your life has been affected by cancer in anyway, please consider pledging so we can continue our work, because local money stays local.

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Inspiring Leaders and Nonprofits
An interview with Rich Schultz
By G. Harvey Gail, MBA, President Spire Management

Each month, I feature local nonprofit leaders who make an impact in the community. Especially during this time of social isolation, we are called to help even more. Check out the end of this article for ways to assist. This month, I visited with Rich Schultz, Board Chair of the nonprofit organization, Family Building Blocks (FBB). FBB works to keep children safe and mentor parents to reduce abuse and neglect. Rich is a Senior Manager at Cherry City Metals LLC. Tell us about your nonprofit Family Building Blocks was founded in 1997 with the goal of keeping children safe and families together. Through our therapeutic Relief Nursery classrooms, therapeutic at-home visits, parent education courses, and respite care, we serve over 1,200 children and 780 families each year: ultimately breaking the cycle of abuse and neglect. Thanks to the services that Family Building Blocks provides, 99% of all children enrolled in our programs can safely remain living with their parents, and out of the foster care system. What led you to be involved in your role at your organization? I first got involved in FBB when I was in high school. My family wanted to find a local nonprofit that would allow us to anonymously give to others during the holiday season. We were quickly connected with FBB, which provided us with lists of families and their specific wants and needs over the holidays. I specifically remember that as a young man, the lists shocked me. They were made up of things that I had previously always taken for granted. Each family’s list consisted of some sort of everyday items like toilet paper, pots, and pans, or cleaning supplies. For me, it was a wake-up call for how lucky I truly was. I immediately knew that it was a cause I wanted to be more involved in. Upon returning to Salem after college, I joined FBB’s Young Leaders Council, which is made up of an incredible group of young professionals throughout the Willamette Valley. After serving as the Council Chair for a year, I was asked to join the board of directors in 2012. In 2016, I was asked to serve as Board Chair for the coming 2018-2020 term and happily accepted. What work experience, training or life events best prepared you for this role? Growing up in a local family business has allowed me to look at the nonprofit world from a very business-minded perspective. At a very young age, I was taught how to interact with an array of different individuals and solve a range of different problems that many businesses encounter. I feel like these skills, which were instilled in me by my parents, have helped me to become more patient, thoughtful and hard-working. My parents are both the most giving individuals I know, and I am incredibly thankful for all they have taught me. In your role, does anything come easy to you? What is difficult or unexpected? I feel like personal relationships have always come easily for me. I truly love being around people and love hearing their stories, and challenges. I’ve always believed that people can do some incredible things together if banded around a cause they believe in. Having those personal connections is the first piece in leading an organization in the direction that you want it to go. One unexpected part of this role was the realization of how great the need is for services. I always knew that the need was there in our area, but not until I entered this position did I realize how many children and families in our community need our wrap-around support. The services that FBB provides give families a hand up, ultimately creating a happier, healthier and more positive community. What are you looking for in future leaders in your group? I think the most important trait of a future leader is based around their true commitment to whatever cause they believe in. With our increasingly hectic lives, it becomes more and more difficult to give as much time to a cause as you’d like. But I would challenge people, especially young people, to find a cause that they are passionate about, get involved and stay committed to it. Because I guarantee that if you are able to do that, you will do more than just change the organization that you are working with, you will positively change yourself in ways that you may not know were possible. How we can help during the current health crisis? We heard from FBB Executive Director Patrice Altenhofen that they are in need of food for food boxes, take out containers for meals, diapers of all sizes, toilet paper, personal hygiene products, baby food, and formula. Chelsea’s Place at 2425 Lancaster is a drop off site. They also may need volunteer drivers so check in on their website for contact information. To learn more about Family Building Blocks you can visit www.familybuildingblocks.org. Are you a volunteer leader of a nonprofit or association? If you or someone you know would like to be featured in my column, email me at harvey@spiremanagement.com

G. Harvey Gail is President of Spire Management, an association management, event planning and consulting firm located in Salem, Oregon. www.SpireManagement.com, @HarvGail

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Stubborn Millennial Myths Dispelled
By Melody Garcia

By 2020, 50% of the workforce will be comprised of Millennials. This percentage increases to 75% in 2025. While this generation has now been in the workplace for several years, there are still some misconceptions about their work ethic and desires. It is important to understand this group of emerging leaders before the next generation enters the workforce in earnest.

The biggest misconception about Millennials, or Generation Y, is that they lack work ethic and are habitual job hoppers. The truth is that many Millennials utilize technology to work smarter, not harder. They tend to work more efficiently and, therefore, finish their work faster. In these cases, it might be beneficial to offer more flexible hours if possible.

Eighty percent of Millennials report that they would be more engaged and interested at work if they were able to learn a new skill. Before becoming frustrated with a Millennial who appears to be goofing off, talk to them about their work. Do they have enough to do? Is it challenging enough? Use this information to determine how to engage them so they do not feel the need to look for a new position. Offer training opportunities as an incentive to stay.

The weight of college debt and the lack of jobs upon graduation have many in this generation feeling the need to move into positions that increase their financial position. Offering the right combination of benefits is key to procuring and retaining top Millennial talent.

Health insurance is the one of the most important factors for Generation Y when considering a job offer. The preference of one's health plan differs from previous generations. Because finances are tight, Millennials prefer low cost, high deductible plans. Since they are generally healthy, they prefer to save money on health insurance premiums and to redirect their funds to paying off student loans.

The second biggest myth of Millennials is that they are entitled. Parents of Millennials tend to be the most involved with their children's adulthood success, for the longest period of time, than any other previous generation. Parents have been known to go so far as to intrude on the interview process. This includes coaching during the interview in person or via text, negotiating salary, and even calling the hiring manager for feedback if an offer is not extended.

While the incidence of this parental involvement is most prevalent immediately following graduation, it is counterproductive, regardless of when it occurs and, thus, perpetuates the myth of entitlement.

Millennials will be quickly moving up in leadership as Baby Boomers and the early Generation X retire. It is important to understand Millennials and how to attract, procure, develop, and retain top talent.

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Heard About Town
By Salem Business Journal Columnist David Souter

When I first decided to move my business to Salem, I kept hearing from people up in Portland that they loved doing business in Salem and that the Salem Chamber of Commerce was their favorite. My first SCC Greeters was at the new Planet Fitness in SE Salem, and I have to say it was a little overwhelming. Naomi Tillery the current Greeter’s Chair and Grayson Eames, the Vice Chair have an amazing rapport which draws everyone in with their playful banner and games. Greeter’s tends to bring in from 120 to 200 people every Friday morning at 8:30. Some people have great tag lines for their businesses, other’s have catch phrases which other’s chime in for, still other’s sing their business themes. But the great thing is everyone is having a great time, and more than that people genuinely like doing business with one another. Jackie Ellerbrock, the General Manager at the South Salem Office Depot at 2945 Liberty Road said that attending Greeter’s has had a huge positive impact on her business. In a recent Greeter’s sponsored by the Salem Business Journal and Masonry Grill celebrating the return of Showbiz, guests included Salem’s beloved Gerry Frank, our great mayor Chuck Bennett, and Gayle Caldarazzo-Doty. My experience at Greeters has been that I’ve made great contacts and networking partners. However, the revitalization of the Salem Chamber of Commerce also has a lot to do with what is going on behind the scenes. Tom Hoffert came in as the new CEO for the Chamber last year and has re-energized and re-engaged existing members in a big way according to Heidi Cowden. He also brought in Zachary Sielicky as the new Membership Coordinator 6 months ago. Zachary has increased Chamber membership by almost 10% in the last 6 months, adding over 90 new members and increasing overall Salem Chamber of Commerce membership to 1010 members. If you’ve never been to a Salem Chamber Greeter’s, and you own a local business, I would highly encourage you to check a couple meetings out and get together with Zachary. Information on locations and contact information can be found at salemchamber.org. It can have a very positive impact on your business.

Da Vinci’s Ristorante has been the jewel of Salem’s restaurant scene for years. On January 11, 2020 Da Vinci’s celebrated their 29th anniversary and we were lucky enough to have Mo Afshar, Da Vinci’s owner and founder sit down with us for a few minutes to talk about how he created and managed such an amazing, delightful, elite restaurant which has been able to stand the test of time and thrive here in Salem. Mo immigrated to the US in 1972 to attend the University of Oregon. He did several things over the next few years and even had a French restaurant in Eugene. When I ask why he didn’t do a French Restaurant here, he says 30 years ago, Salem wasn’t ready for a high-end French Restaurant.  His brother Hans, who is now the head chef at Bentley’s suggested he open a restaurant here in Salem. They partnered on Da Vinci’s at first, but later split. Mo says Da Vinci’s is one of the hardest challenges he ever faced. They struggled for years, and only survived because of dedication, hard work and because he loves people, great food and his beloved Da Vinci’s. He admits he may be a bit of a work-a-holic. Every day he gets arrives at the restaurant at 8 AM, still driving up from Eugene, where his family, children and grandchildren live. Mo attributes a lot of his success to his constant desire to keep things fresh and new. He is constantly adding new decorations, foods, wines and features. When Mo does escape the restaurant, you can find him pursuing his other two great passions, playing soccer with the college kids in Eugene, or hanging out with his family and his grandkids. Would he do it all again? He says he’s not sure, but when you see the intense love and pride he shows for this restaurant, my guess is he’d have a hard time not!

Reid Sund is the challenger for the 7th Ward City Council seat opposing incumbent Vanessa Nordyke. Reid was born in Salem and moved to San Diego for college at Point Loma Nazarene University where he majored in Accounting. He then worked as an auditor for the Federal Government achieving the CPA designation. Currently, Reid is the Director of Finance for Salem Health Hospitals & Clinics. His family has a long tradition of working for Salem Health, his mother will soon be celebrating her 40th anniversary at Salem Health. His wife and he have 3 children ages 4 (in May), 2 (in April) and the newest baby girl at 3 months. They live in South Salem and see Salem as a perfect place to raise their young family. Reid has been on the City of Salem Citizen Budget Committee for 2 years. Reid’s top 3 priorities are 1) Homelessness—What to do about sidewalks downtown, and the complex layers of this growing concern in our community. So far Reid has met with Taylor’s House, The Home (drop in center for teens) and The Arches Day Center as well as experts on the front lines learning about potential solutions. 2) Reid is a big proponent for the 3rd bridge and would like to immediately start meeting with ODOT and the Federal Highway Commission to get the project back moving. 3) Budget—He has some issues with the new employee-paid payroll tax which will also be on the May Ballot. While he is aware that the city has a fiscal imbalance in the general fund, he is concerned that the mechanism proposed cannot be guaranteed for public safety. Reid believes his biggest strengths are he is a commonsense leader, problem solver, and good at collaboration in our community.

Matt Kuerbis and Catt Sutherland like it hot. Working in Costa Rica together, they used Matt’s background as a chef to start creating and making hot sauce. In 2016 they bottled their 1st batch of Hot Sauce and started using the brand name Hoss Soss. They started by going to local farmer’s market’s here in Oregon, but they quickly realized that they wanted to be in retail. There story really is one of the power of perseverance. In 2016 they did about 2700 in total revenue, by 2017, it reached $25k and by last year they moved above $50k. How did they do it? They eventually wound up with 3 gourmet Hoss Soss’s with sauce flavors Guajillo-Roasted pepper sauce for tacos, eggs etc, Bi-Bim-based on Korean Bi-bim-bop for stir fry and as a meat marinade and Tamarind-Thai style habanero sauce. But their real grind was getting into new locations. Their first big win was getting into Roth Fresh Market’s here in Salem. Over the next couple of years they were able to get into New Seasons, Market of Choice and  Made in Oregon Stores. In the summer of 2019, they were placed in Fred Meyer’s Local Section, but that section has recently been restructured, so their future at Fred’s is currently up in the air. Every year the company does a Hoss Soss retreat to Costa Rica, this year it’s March 20-24. For information on the retreat, or more information on Hoss Soss, please visit HossSoss.com.

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A few things to note:

Shipments should arrive within 2-3 business days.

Since we're shipping alcohol, you'll have to show ID and sign upon arrival.

Shipping is for Oregon ONLY.

We appreciate your support during these tough times. Stay strong everyone and we can't wait to see you back in our pubs soon!

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Kickin’ Cancer (in the Donkey)

What is the best thing a woman can do to battle cancer?  Go running in the mud with dozens of enthusiastic supporters, of course.  That is exactly what Brenda Farris did at the suggestion of her brother, Baron Robison.  Along with supplements, Brenda is fighting metastatic breast cancer with diet and exercise.  She thought it would be an impressive display of her determination to beat it by participating in the Warrior Dash in Canby, OR.  She made the decision to do it in January 2018 and by May she, along with 42 other runners, wearing HOT pink t-shirts were covered in mud.  This bold, courageous plan attracted the attention of KGW’s Tracy Barry who produced a feature story for a Channel 8 news program that aired the beginning of March 2018.  (To get the link to Tracy Barry’s feature on KGW Channel 8, go to the home page of HelpTeamBrenda.com)

As Brenda was flying home to Mesa, AZ Baron realized her story, to stay alive, had actually inspired others to fight their own fight for their own reasons.  So in July 2018, Brenda and Baron formed HelpTeamBrenda, a business designed for fundraising along with promoting cancer awareness and educate people how to  ProActively  Prevent.  In Aug. 2018 Brenda returned to Oregon for a Spartan race and held a joint fundraiser for a coworker of Baron’s who was also dealing with breast cancer.  She returned again in October for another fundraiser to assist a family who had lost their father to brain cancer. In Dec.2018 HelpTeamBrenda partnered with MOD Pizza locations in Salem, Sherwood, Lake Oswego, and Milwaukie to fundraise for GoTeamMarissa that assisted Marissa Leigh in her struggle with breast cancer.

After the success of these fundraisers Baron realized it was time to create “WeAreTheSolution – United to Prevent” (WATSUP), as a Domestic Non-Profit Corporation in Oregon.  WATSUP’s mission is to: EMPOWER individuals to take control of their own bodies, so that cancer cases are significantly reduced, through ProActive Prevention.  WATSUP!’s movement is gaining speed as more people believe that there is a solution.  Their goal is to fund services that are needed, but are not being provided by other organizations.  WATSUP plans to make these “gap services” available for those combating cancer.  For example: the $500 per month Brenda spends on supplements that are not covered by her insurance.

For more inspiring stories go to Kicking-Cancer.org

Baron Robison can be reached at HelpTeamBrenda@gmail.com

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For many people, the ideal place to retire encompasses a balanced mix of safety, affordability and healthcare access. While some retirees plan to spend their non-working days relaxing, others plan to keep working…at least part time. A 2019 AARP study found that more than 20% of people 65 and older are working or looking for work, compared to just 10% in 1985.

In a new study, SmartAsset crunched the numbers to find the best places for retirees to live and work. We compared 525 U.S. cities across eight metrics, including unemployment rate for seniors, estimated tax burden for seniors, crime rates and access to important amenities like medical centers and retirement communities.

Salem cracks the top 25 places for retirees to live and work. To see exactly where the city ranks and the other top-ranking locales, check out the table below.

The full report, including the methodology and rankings, can be found here: https://smartasset.com/retirement/best-places-to-retire-in-the-us

 

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